God is just a metaphor.

Note: This is an excerpt from the book that I am currently reading - The Universe Versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence. This particular chapter entitled “Electrical Storms” really struck me especially when Dr. Enderby (Alex’s neurologist) started talking about God and the human brain’s resemblance to each other. After reading this, I couldn’t agree more to what Dr. Enderby said. His explanation somehow answered my question “Did God created man because He was lonely or was it the other way around?” I don’t know. I am not a religious type of person so maybe I am looking for the answers in the wrong place. Hahaha! Call me blasphemous but this is just me and my insomniac brain talking. :)

Dr. Enderby’s views on God and meditation were definitely linked to his views about the brain. On his office wall, he had a funnyy little plaque with spidery black writing on it - like old, joined-up handwriting. And this is what it said:

The Brain is just the weight of God -

For - Heft them - Pound for Pound -

And they will differ - if they do -

As Syllable from Sound -

The first time I saw that plaque, I had very little idea what it meant, and absolutely no idea why there were all those dashes and random capital letters scattered all over the place. (Mr. Treadstone, my then future English teacher, would have red-penned each and every one of those.) But I loved the way it sounded nevertheless.

When I eventually got round to asking Dr. Enderby about the plaque, a few years later, he told me that it was the last stanza from a poem by a very old, very dead American poet called Emily Dickinson. When I asked him what it meant, he wouldn’t tell me. Instead he asked what I  thought it meant.

'I don’t know,' I said after a fewseconds of scratching my crew-cut. 'I know what the words mean, but I can't make sense of them all together.'

'Hmm,' said Dr. Enderby. Then he scratched his head for a bit. 'Well, what do you think the difference between a syllable and a sound is?'

'There isn’t all that much difference,' I said. 'A sound is a sound, and a syllable's kind of a sound too. A syllable's a chunk of sound in a word. Or sometimes it's the whole word. Like the word “sound” is a sound made of one syllable.'

I wasn’t too satisfied with the way I’d explained this, but Dr. Enderby seemed to understand. ‘So maybe that’s the point,’ he said. ‘Maybe they aren’t all that different. Just like God and the brain aren’t all that different.’

'How can God and the brain not be different?' I asked, frowning.

Dr. Enderby smiled and adjusted his glasses. ‘Well, for each of us the brain creates a whole, unique universe. It contains everything we know. Everything we see or touch. Everything we feel and remember. In a sense, our brains create all of reality for us. Without the brain, there’s nothing. Some people find this idea scary, but I think it’s rather beautiful. That’s the reason I like to keep that plaque on my wall, where I can see it every day.’

I told Dr. Enderby that I was still a little confused at this point – what with him being a Buddhist.

'When I look at that poem, God’s just a metaphor,' Dr. Enderby explained.

'So you don't think that God created the brain?' I asked.

'No, I don’t think that,' Dr. Enderby replied. 'I think that the brain created God. Because the human brain, however wonderful, is still quite fallible – as both you and I know. It's always searching for answers, but even when it’s working as it should, its explanations are rarely perfect – especially when it comes to very big, complicated questions. That's why wehave to nurture it. We have to give it plenty of space to develop.'

That was the gist of what Dr. Enderby told me. His brain had spent a tremendous amount of time thinking about the brain.

1 week ago   •   1 note
Recent read :)

Recent read :)

CURRENTLY READING: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

When Cameron Post’s parents die suddenly in a car crash, her shocking first thought is relief. Relief they’ll never know that, hours earlier, she had been kissing a girl.But that relief doesn’t last, and Cam is soon forced to move in with her conservative aunt Ruth and her well-intentioned but hopelessly old-fashioned grandmother. She knows that from this point on, her life will forever be different. Survival in Miles City, Montana, means blending in and leaving well enough alone (as her grandmother might say), and Cam becomes an expert at both.Then Coley Taylor moves to town. Beautiful, pickup-driving Coley is a perfect cowgirl with the perfect boyfriend to match. She and Cam forge an unexpected and intense friendship—one that seems to leave room for something more to emerge. But just as that starts to seem like a real possibility, ultrareligious Aunt Ruth takes drastic action to “fix” her niece, bringing Cam face-to-face with the cost of denying her true self—even if she’s not exactly sure who that is.The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a stunning and unforgettable literary debut about discovering who you are and finding the courage to live life according to your own rules.

CURRENTLY READING: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

When Cameron Post’s parents die suddenly in a car crash, her shocking first thought is relief. Relief they’ll never know that, hours earlier, she had been kissing a girl.

But that relief doesn’t last, and Cam is soon forced to move in with her conservative aunt Ruth and her well-intentioned but hopelessly old-fashioned grandmother. She knows that from this point on, her life will forever be different. Survival in Miles City, Montana, means blending in and leaving well enough alone (as her grandmother might say), and Cam becomes an expert at both.

Then Coley Taylor moves to town. Beautiful, pickup-driving Coley is a perfect cowgirl with the perfect boyfriend to match. She and Cam forge an unexpected and intense friendship—one that seems to leave room for something more to emerge. But just as that starts to seem like a real possibility, ultrareligious Aunt Ruth takes drastic action to “fix” her niece, bringing Cam face-to-face with the cost of denying her true self—even if she’s not exactly sure who that is.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a stunning and unforgettable literary debut about discovering who you are and finding the courage to live life according to your own rules.

2 weeks ago   •   4 notes

Georgie. You cannot be jealous of Dawn—that’s like the sun being jealous of a lightbulb.

 - Rainbow Rowell, Landline